Rhino monitoring in Namibia

WildTrack teams led by Dr Peter Law in Namibia are monitoring black rhino for the Namibian government.  We’re running pilots at three different locations (confidentiality maintained for security) using FIT and matching heel patterns to individuals for quick reference.  Horseback monitoring can also allow our teams to cover more ground…

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Our tapir study reported by Duke University

Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment reports on our paper in Peer J demonstrating that FIT can be used to monitor tapir populations in the Atlantic forest of Brazil, with co-authors Drs Danielle Moreira, Cristina da Cunha, Jardel Seibert and Andressa Gatti.    

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ConservationFIT: update for ex-situ partners

From Karin Schwartz, PhD, Scientific Coordinator for Ex-Situ Partners, ConservationFIT ConservationFIT Ex-Situ Update The ConservationFIT project was initiated in the summer of 2016 by WildTrack. FIT is a footprint identification technique that uses morphometrics from footprint images to provide identification of species, individual, sex and age-class from footprints alone. Each…

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From bushmen to biometrics in Namibia

We recently visited Namibia with Susan and Ray Ellis, founders of Footpath pictures.  They produced a beautiful short film that relates how footprints produce biometrics to help us protect endangered species.  We describe the potential of deep learning to help process these data. With the help of local San trackers…

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Giant panda publication in Biological Conservation

With co-authors from Duke Kunshan University and the Chinese Center for Research and Conservation of the Giant Panda, we report on the use of footprints to monitor Giant panda in China. Li, Binbin V., Sky Alibhai, Zoe Jewell, Desheng Li, and Hemin Zhang. 2018/2. “Using Footprints to Identify and Sex Giant…

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Cheetah + sand = footprints? Not quite so fast…

ConservationFIT is partnering with organisations that host ‘ambassador’ animals whose footprints can help us protect their free-ranging cousins.  Oregon’s Wildlife Safari is helping us by collecting prints from their cheetahs.  Maddy Tweedt, a carnivore keeper there, recounts her team’s trials and tribulations in finding the ‘right kind of sand’ to…

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Keeping cheetah FIT!

Larissa Slaney, our PhD student at Heriott Watt University, Edinburgh, interviewed for The National Scot on her project to keep cheetah FIT http://www.thenational.scot/news/15588082.Scottish_scientists_in_crucial_research_project_to_save_the_cheetah/    

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